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Drones have become an almost essential part of any filmmaker’s kit. The ability to take 4k aerial footage for under £1,000 is one of the most incredible leaps forward in camera technology since the digital revolution.

 

In this blog we’ll be going over why the Mavic series are our drones of choice for client work. There are a number of reasons why we think one of these should be your first port of call when investing in a drone, and there are definitely some things we’d change too.

 

We’ll give you a quick rundown of each drone in the Mavic series, along with their strengths, weaknesses and a beautiful video to keep you going.

 

Let’s get to it.

Mavic Air

The Mavic Air is the cheapest, and smallest, member of the Mavic family. If you measure by footprint, it’s actually smaller than the spark too, due to the fact the propeller arms fold away. The Air has been exhaulted by filmmakers such as Casey Neistat, Philip Bloom and Sam Kolder due to it’s size and remarkable image quality.

 

This video (from one of our favourite up and coming filmmakers Zach Ramelen) shows off the incredible image quality:

That Air’s size is also a big thing to consider when getting cinematic shots. Sam Kolder’s newest “vlog” shows off what’s possible when it comes to flying your drone through smaller and smaller gaps to create some truly stunning shots.

Why does the picture look so damn good? Well Philip Bloom tells us it’s a compression issue. Very simply put, the Mavic Air compresses it’s footage less than the Mavic Pro. This means that it outputs an arguably better image than it’s big brother, the Mavic Pro. But what are the specs?

 

We’ve condensed them into what we thought were the most essential, but you can find the full spec list here.

Video Capabilities:

 Sensor: 12MP

Lens: 24mm equiv.

Resolutions: 4k 24/25/30p

           2.7k 24/25/30/48/50/60p

           FHD 24/25/30/48/50/60/120p

           HD 24/25/30/48/50/60/120p

Bit Rate:        100mbps

Codecs:         MP4/MOV (H.364/MPEG-4 AVC)

 

Size

Weight: 430g

Folded: 168x83x39mm (LxWxH)

Unfolded: 168x184x64mm (LxWxH)

 

Movement

Max Speed (Sport): 68.4kph

Max Speed: 28.8kph

 

Battery

20mins (ish). The official DJI stats say you should get 22-minutes of flight time, but that’s affected by whether you’re recording video, wind speed, flight speed etc.

 

Ease of use

It’s a DJI drone. Do we need to say more?

 

Every model in the Mavic series is plug and play. Charge your remote and batteries and, with the exception of a software update or two, you’re pretty much ready to fly.

 

This is can be both positive and negative. Obviously it’s amazingly quick to set-up and get off the ground, however this leaves it open to use by very very inexperienced pilots. Watch the skies.

Mavic Pro

The Mavic Pro was the first truly portable drone that gave stunning results. Folding down to a size that meant having it in your camera bag was not a worry, and it revolutionised the online content creation game for a lot of YouTubers. Having influencers popularize the drone, and singing it’s praises about size; portability and image quality did wonders for the DJI brand.

Now that the Mavic Pro is almost three years old, its image quality has come into question by a number of times from professional DOPs and Cinematographers – most notably Philip Bloom. The issue comes from the Mavic dealing with 4k footage with just 60mbps bit rate. This level of compression gives the footage a very sharp look. Despite this, the Mavic is still capable of producing some stunning results if you are able to optimize the settings. There are a number of tutorials online of how to do this.

Video Capabilities:

Sensor: 12.35MP

Lens: 35mm equiv.

Resolutions: 4k 24/25/30p

           2.7k 24/25/30/48/50/60p

           FHD 24/25/30/48/50/60/120p

           HD 24/25/30/48/50/60/120p

Bit Rate:        60mbps

Codecs:         MP4/MOV (H.364/MPEG-4 AVC)

 

Size

Weight: 734g

Folded: 198x83x83mm (LxWxH)

Movement

Max Speed (Sport): 65kph

 

Battery 

21mins (ish). The official DJI stats say you should get 22-minutes of flight time, but that’s affected by whether you’re recording video, wind speed, flight speed etc.

 

Ease of use

Again, similar to the Mavic Air, this drone is designed for consumers and so is exceptionally easy to get into the air. The only draw back is the level of experimentation needed to produce exceptional images. Here at Studio 24-7 we’ve spent a number of hours doing comparison tests between picture and colour profiles to ensure we have the optimum image quality for production.

Mavic 2 Pro

The Mavic 2 Pro came out part way through 2018 and upped the Mavic series’ game in terms of image quality by increasing the size of the sensor.

Philip Bloom highly recommends the Mavic 2 Pro (here’s the same video from above, for your convenience). We trust Philip Bloom. With an increased sensor size, you’re able to get more light and a greater number of pixels recording the light. Not only that, but the Mavic 2 Pro has the ability to record in 10-bit colour. This exponentially increases the number of colours the Mavic 2 Pro has available, and reduces things like banding and other artifacts, as well as allowing the footage to hold up to more rigorous grading in post.

If you’re looking for a portable Mavic, this is what we would recommend.

Video Capabilities:

Sensor: 20MP

Lens: 35mm equiv. (f/2.8-f/11).

Resolutions: 4k 24/25/30p

           2.7k 24/25/30/48/50/60p

           FHD 24/25/30/48/50/60/120p

 

Bit Rate:        100mbps

Codecs:         MP4/MOV (H.264/MPEG-4 AVC, HVEC/H.265)

 

Size

Weight: 907g

Folded: 214x91x84mm (LxWxH)

Unfolded: 322x242x84mm (LxWxH)

 

Movement

Max Speed (Sport): 72kph

 

Battery

25mins (ish). The official DJI stats say you should get 31-minutes of flight time, but that’s affected by whether you’re recording video, wind speed, flight speed etc.

 

Ease of use

More akin to the Mavic Air in ease of use, the Mavic 2 Pro is plug-and-go. Again, you can fiddle with the settings to maximize image quality, but we’re hoping that if you’re buying this for reasons like 10-bit colour that you already kind of know what you’re doing.

Mavic 2 Zoom

For the longest time we didn’t really see the point of purchasing a Mavic 2 Zoom over a Mavic 2 Pro. Sure, it makes the Alfred Hitchcock Rear Window Dolly Zoom shot a little easier, enabling you to do it in camera rather than in post, but other than that, why go with reduced image quality?

There are two reasons we can think of. Having a zoom option allows for greater parallax in panning shots, potentially increasing the production value of your pieces as parallax isn’t something usually seen in drone footage. Having a long lens on an aerial shot has previously been restricted to expensive helicopter/gimbal combos. This point alone makes it worth considering the Mavic 2 Zoom, where previously the Mavic 2 Pro might have seemed like a ‘no-brainer’ decision.

The second factor where a Zoom maybe preferential over a Pro is in wildlife filmmaking. If you’re an amateur wildlife filmmaker making content for YouTube/online, a Zoom would allow you to get a wider variety of framing without distressing the animals who are your subjects. You need to be very careful when flying drones around wildlife, as distressing them in any way is unethical for a number of reasons (and a topic for another blog), but having a zoom capability really increases the reach of the camera on your Mavic.

Video Capabilities:

Sensor: 12MP

Lens: 24(f/2.8)-48(f/3.8)mm equiv.

Resolutions: 4k 24/25/30p

           2.7k 24/25/30/48/50/60p

           FHD 24/25/30/48/50/60/120p

 

Bit Rate:        100mbps

Codecs:         MP4/MOV (H.264/MPEG-4 AVC, HVEC/H.265)

 

Size

Weight: 905g

Folded: 214x91x84mm (LxWxH)

Unfolded: 322x242x84mm (LxWxH)

 

Movement

Max Speed (Sport): 72kph

 

Battery

25mins (ish). The official DJI stats say you should get 31-minutes of flight time, but that’s affected by whether you’re recording video, wind speed, flight speed etc.

 

Ease of use 

Though the flight controls are the same as the Mavic 2 Pro, the Zoom will take a little extra finesse if you’re planning on using the zoom feature to get some dynamic shots.

Conclusion

The Mavic series is a very versatile group of aircraft. With the size, range and quality to deliver on a number of different client projects, a Mavic is quickly becoming an essential piece of kit for every filmmaker.

If you’re looking for something that takes up barely any space, kicks out 4k video and allows you to get a new perspective on your shot then the Mavic is probably the best place to start.

We will be doing some more comparisons in coming months, so let us know what you’d be interested in hearing about by commenting on this post or sending us a message on social media!

Drones have become an almost essential part of any filmmaker’s kit. The ability to take 4k aerial footage for under £1,000 is one of the most incredible leaps forward in camera technology since the digital revolution.

 

In this blog we’ll be going over why the Mavic series are our drones of choice for client work. There are a number of reasons why we think one of these should be your first port of call when investing in a drone, and there are definitely some things we’d change too.

 

We’ll give you a quick rundown of each drone in the Mavic series, along with their strengths, weaknesses and a beautiful video to keep you going.

 

Let’s get to it.

Mavic Air

The Mavic Air is the cheapest, and smallest, member of the Mavic family. If you measure by footprint, it’s actually smaller than the spark too, due to the fact the propeller arms fold away. The Air has been exhaulted by filmmakers such as Casey Neistat, Philip Bloom and Sam Kolder due to it’s size and remarkable image quality.

 

This video (from one of our favourite up and coming filmmakers Zach Ramelen) shows off the incredible image quality:

That Air’s size is also a big thing to consider when getting cinematic shots. Sam Kolder’s newest “vlog” shows off what’s possible when it comes to flying your drone through smaller and smaller gaps to create some truly stunning shots.

Why does the picture look so damn good? Well Philip Bloom tells us it’s a compression issue. Very simply put, the Mavic Air compresses it’s footage less than the Mavic Pro. This means that it outputs an arguably better image than it’s big brother, the Mavic Pro. But what are the specs?

 

We’ve condensed them into what we thought were the most essential, but you can find the full spec list here.

Video Capabilities:

 Sensor: 12MP

Lens: 24mm equiv.

Resolutions: 4k 24/25/30p

           2.7k 24/25/30/48/50/60p

           FHD 24/25/30/48/50/60/120p

           HD 24/25/30/48/50/60/120p

Bit Rate:        100mbps

Codecs:         MP4/MOV (H.364/MPEG-4 AVC)

 

Size

Weight: 430g

Folded: 168x83x39mm (LxWxH)

Unfolded: 168x184x64mm (LxWxH)

 

Movement

Max Speed (Sport): 68.4kph

Max Speed: 28.8kph

 

Battery

20mins (ish). The official DJI stats say you should get 22-minutes of flight time, but that’s affected by whether you’re recording video, wind speed, flight speed etc.

 

Ease of use

It’s a DJI drone. Do we need to say more?

 

Every model in the Mavic series is plug and play. Charge your remote and batteries and, with the exception of a software update or two, you’re pretty much ready to fly.

 

This is can be both positive and negative. Obviously it’s amazingly quick to set-up and get off the ground, however this leaves it open to use by very very inexperienced pilots. Watch the skies.

Mavic Pro

The Mavic Pro was the first truly portable drone that gave stunning results. Folding down to a size that meant having it in your camera bag was not a worry, and it revolutionised the online content creation game for a lot of YouTubers. Having influencers popularize the drone, and singing it’s praises about size; portability and image quality did wonders for the DJI brand.

Now that the Mavic Pro is almost three years old, its image quality has come into question by a number of times from professional DOPs and Cinematographers – most notably Philip Bloom. The issue comes from the Mavic dealing with 4k footage with just 60mbps bit rate. This level of compression gives the footage a very sharp look. Despite this, the Mavic is still capable of producing some stunning results if you are able to optimize the settings. There are a number of tutorials online of how to do this.

Video Capabilities:

Sensor: 12.35MP

Lens: 35mm equiv.

Resolutions: 4k 24/25/30p

           2.7k 24/25/30/48/50/60p

           FHD 24/25/30/48/50/60/120p

           HD 24/25/30/48/50/60/120p

Bit Rate:        60mbps

Codecs:         MP4/MOV (H.364/MPEG-4 AVC)

 

Size

Weight: 734g

Folded: 198x83x83mm (LxWxH)

Movement

Max Speed (Sport): 65kph

 

Battery 

21mins (ish). The official DJI stats say you should get 22-minutes of flight time, but that’s affected by whether you’re recording video, wind speed, flight speed etc.

 

Ease of use

Again, similar to the Mavic Air, this drone is designed for consumers and so is exceptionally easy to get into the air. The only draw back is the level of experimentation needed to produce exceptional images. Here at Studio 24-7 we’ve spent a number of hours doing comparison tests between picture and colour profiles to ensure we have the optimum image quality for production.

Mavic 2 Pro

The Mavic 2 Pro came out part way through 2018 and upped the Mavic series’ game in terms of image quality by increasing the size of the sensor.

Philip Bloom highly recommends the Mavic 2 Pro (here’s the same video from above, for your convenience). We trust Philip Bloom. With an increased sensor size, you’re able to get more light and a greater number of pixels recording the light. Not only that, but the Mavic 2 Pro has the ability to record in 10-bit colour. This exponentially increases the number of colours the Mavic 2 Pro has available, and reduces things like banding and other artifacts, as well as allowing the footage to hold up to more rigorous grading in post.

If you’re looking for a portable Mavic, this is what we would recommend.

Video Capabilities:

Sensor: 20MP

Lens: 35mm equiv. (f/2.8-f/11).

Resolutions: 4k 24/25/30p

           2.7k 24/25/30/48/50/60p

           FHD 24/25/30/48/50/60/120p

 

Bit Rate:        100mbps

Codecs:         MP4/MOV (H.264/MPEG-4 AVC, HVEC/H.265)

 

Size

Weight: 907g

Folded: 214x91x84mm (LxWxH)

Unfolded: 322x242x84mm (LxWxH)

 

Movement

Max Speed (Sport): 72kph

 

Battery

25mins (ish). The official DJI stats say you should get 31-minutes of flight time, but that’s affected by whether you’re recording video, wind speed, flight speed etc.

 

Ease of use

More akin to the Mavic Air in ease of use, the Mavic 2 Pro is plug-and-go. Again, you can fiddle with the settings to maximize image quality, but we’re hoping that if you’re buying this for reasons like 10-bit colour that you already kind of know what you’re doing.

Mavic 2 Zoom

For the longest time we didn’t really see the point of purchasing a Mavic 2 Zoom over a Mavic 2 Pro. Sure, it makes the Alfred Hitchcock Rear Window Dolly Zoom shot a little easier, enabling you to do it in camera rather than in post, but other than that, why go with reduced image quality?

There are two reasons we can think of. Having a zoom option allows for greater parallax in panning shots, potentially increasing the production value of your pieces as parallax isn’t something usually seen in drone footage. Having a long lens on an aerial shot has previously been restricted to expensive helicopter/gimbal combos. This point alone makes it worth considering the Mavic 2 Zoom, where previously the Mavic 2 Pro might have seemed like a ‘no-brainer’ decision.

The second factor where a Zoom maybe preferential over a Pro is in wildlife filmmaking. If you’re an amateur wildlife filmmaker making content for YouTube/online, a Zoom would allow you to get a wider variety of framing without distressing the animals who are your subjects. You need to be very careful when flying drones around wildlife, as distressing them in any way is unethical for a number of reasons (and a topic for another blog), but having a zoom capability really increases the reach of the camera on your Mavic.

Video Capabilities:

Sensor: 12MP

Lens: 24(f/2.8)-48(f/3.8)mm equiv.

Resolutions: 4k 24/25/30p

           2.7k 24/25/30/48/50/60p

           FHD 24/25/30/48/50/60/120p

 

Bit Rate:        100mbps

Codecs:         MP4/MOV (H.264/MPEG-4 AVC, HVEC/H.265)

 

Size

Weight: 905g

Folded: 214x91x84mm (LxWxH)

Unfolded: 322x242x84mm (LxWxH)

 

Movement

Max Speed (Sport): 72kph

 

Battery

25mins (ish). The official DJI stats say you should get 31-minutes of flight time, but that’s affected by whether you’re recording video, wind speed, flight speed etc.

 

Ease of use 

Though the flight controls are the same as the Mavic 2 Pro, the Zoom will take a little extra finesse if you’re planning on using the zoom feature to get some dynamic shots.

Conclusion

The Mavic series is a very versatile group of aircraft. With the size, range and quality to deliver on a number of different client projects, a Mavic is quickly becoming an essential piece of kit for every filmmaker.

If you’re looking for something that takes up barely any space, kicks out 4k video and allows you to get a new perspective on your shot then the Mavic is probably the best place to start.

We will be doing some more comparisons in coming months, so let us know what you’d be interested in hearing about by commenting on this post or sending us a message on social media!

Drones have become an almost essential part of any filmmaker’s kit. The ability to take 4k aerial footage for under £1,000 is one of the most incredible leaps forward in camera technology since the digital revolution.

 

In this blog we’ll be going over why the Mavic series are our drones of choice for client work. There are a number of reasons why we think one of these should be your first port of call when investing in a drone, and there are definitely some things we’d change too.

 

We’ll give you a quick rundown of each drone in the Mavic series, along with their strengths, weaknesses and a beautiful video to keep you going.

 

Let’s get to it.

Mavic Air

The Mavic Air is the cheapest, and smallest, member of the Mavic family. If you measure by footprint, it’s actually smaller than the spark too, due to the fact the propeller arms fold away. The Air has been exhaulted by filmmakers such as Casey Neistat, Philip Bloom and Sam Kolder due to it’s size and remarkable image quality.

 

This video (from one of our favourite up and coming filmmakers Zach Ramelen) shows off the incredible image quality:

That Air’s size is also a big thing to consider when getting cinematic shots. Sam Kolder’s newest “vlog” shows off what’s possible when it comes to flying your drone through smaller and smaller gaps to create some truly stunning shots.

Why does the picture look so damn good? Well Philip Bloom tells us it’s a compression issue. Very simply put, the Mavic Air compresses it’s footage less than the Mavic Pro. This means that it outputs an arguably better image than it’s big brother, the Mavic Pro. But what are the specs?

 

We’ve condensed them into what we thought were the most essential, but you can find the full spec list here.

Video Capabilities:

 Sensor: 12MP

Lens: 24mm equiv.

Resolutions: 4k 24/25/30p

           2.7k 24/25/30/48/50/60p

           FHD 24/25/30/48/50/60/120p

           HD 24/25/30/48/50/60/120p

Bit Rate:        100mbps

Codecs:         MP4/MOV (H.364/MPEG-4 AVC)

 

Size

Weight: 430g

Folded: 168x83x39mm (LxWxH)

Unfolded: 168x184x64mm (LxWxH)

 

Movement

Max Speed (Sport): 68.4kph

Max Speed: 28.8kph

 

Battery

20mins (ish). The official DJI stats say you should get 22-minutes of flight time, but that’s affected by whether you’re recording video, wind speed, flight speed etc.

 

Ease of use

It’s a DJI drone. Do we need to say more?

 

Every model in the Mavic series is plug and play. Charge your remote and batteries and, with the exception of a software update or two, you’re pretty much ready to fly.

 

This is can be both positive and negative. Obviously it’s amazingly quick to set-up and get off the ground, however this leaves it open to use by very very inexperienced pilots. Watch the skies.

Mavic Pro

The Mavic Pro was the first truly portable drone that gave stunning results. Folding down to a size that meant having it in your camera bag was not a worry, and it revolutionised the online content creation game for a lot of YouTubers. Having influencers popularize the drone, and singing it’s praises about size; portability and image quality did wonders for the DJI brand.

Now that the Mavic Pro is almost three years old, its image quality has come into question by a number of times from professional DOPs and Cinematographers – most notably Philip Bloom. The issue comes from the Mavic dealing with 4k footage with just 60mbps bit rate. This level of compression gives the footage a very sharp look. Despite this, the Mavic is still capable of producing some stunning results if you are able to optimize the settings. There are a number of tutorials online of how to do this.

Video Capabilities:

Sensor: 12.35MP

Lens: 35mm equiv.

Resolutions: 4k 24/25/30p

           2.7k 24/25/30/48/50/60p

           FHD 24/25/30/48/50/60/120p

           HD 24/25/30/48/50/60/120p

Bit Rate:        60mbps

Codecs:         MP4/MOV (H.364/MPEG-4 AVC)

 

Size

Weight: 734g

Folded: 198x83x83mm (LxWxH)

Movement

Max Speed (Sport): 65kph

 

Battery 

21mins (ish). The official DJI stats say you should get 22-minutes of flight time, but that’s affected by whether you’re recording video, wind speed, flight speed etc.

 

Ease of use

Again, similar to the Mavic Air, this drone is designed for consumers and so is exceptionally easy to get into the air. The only draw back is the level of experimentation needed to produce exceptional images. Here at Studio 24-7 we’ve spent a number of hours doing comparison tests between picture and colour profiles to ensure we have the optimum image quality for production.

Mavic 2 Pro

The Mavic 2 Pro came out part way through 2018 and upped the Mavic series’ game in terms of image quality by increasing the size of the sensor.

Philip Bloom highly recommends the Mavic 2 Pro (here’s the same video from above, for your convenience). We trust Philip Bloom. With an increased sensor size, you’re able to get more light and a greater number of pixels recording the light. Not only that, but the Mavic 2 Pro has the ability to record in 10-bit colour. This exponentially increases the number of colours the Mavic 2 Pro has available, and reduces things like banding and other artifacts, as well as allowing the footage to hold up to more rigorous grading in post.

If you’re looking for a portable Mavic, this is what we would recommend.

Video Capabilities:

Sensor: 20MP

Lens: 35mm equiv. (f/2.8-f/11).

Resolutions: 4k 24/25/30p

           2.7k 24/25/30/48/50/60p

           FHD 24/25/30/48/50/60/120p

 

Bit Rate:        100mbps

Codecs:         MP4/MOV (H.264/MPEG-4 AVC, HVEC/H.265)

 

Size

Weight: 907g

Folded: 214x91x84mm (LxWxH)

Unfolded: 322x242x84mm (LxWxH)

 

Movement

Max Speed (Sport): 72kph

 

Battery

25mins (ish). The official DJI stats say you should get 31-minutes of flight time, but that’s affected by whether you’re recording video, wind speed, flight speed etc.

 

Ease of use

More akin to the Mavic Air in ease of use, the Mavic 2 Pro is plug-and-go. Again, you can fiddle with the settings to maximize image quality, but we’re hoping that if you’re buying this for reasons like 10-bit colour that you already kind of know what you’re doing.

Mavic 2 Zoom

For the longest time we didn’t really see the point of purchasing a Mavic 2 Zoom over a Mavic 2 Pro. Sure, it makes the Alfred Hitchcock Rear Window Dolly Zoom shot a little easier, enabling you to do it in camera rather than in post, but other than that, why go with reduced image quality?

There are two reasons we can think of. Having a zoom option allows for greater parallax in panning shots, potentially increasing the production value of your pieces as parallax isn’t something usually seen in drone footage. Having a long lens on an aerial shot has previously been restricted to expensive helicopter/gimbal combos. This point alone makes it worth considering the Mavic 2 Zoom, where previously the Mavic 2 Pro might have seemed like a ‘no-brainer’ decision.

The second factor where a Zoom maybe preferential over a Pro is in wildlife filmmaking. If you’re an amateur wildlife filmmaker making content for YouTube/online, a Zoom would allow you to get a wider variety of framing without distressing the animals who are your subjects. You need to be very careful when flying drones around wildlife, as distressing them in any way is unethical for a number of reasons (and a topic for another blog), but having a zoom capability really increases the reach of the camera on your Mavic.

Video Capabilities:

Sensor: 12MP

Lens: 24(f/2.8)-48(f/3.8)mm equiv.

Resolutions: 4k 24/25/30p

           2.7k 24/25/30/48/50/60p

           FHD 24/25/30/48/50/60/120p

 

Bit Rate:        100mbps

Codecs:         MP4/MOV (H.264/MPEG-4 AVC, HVEC/H.265)

 

Size

Weight: 905g

Folded: 214x91x84mm (LxWxH)

Unfolded: 322x242x84mm (LxWxH)

 

Movement

Max Speed (Sport): 72kph

 

Battery

25mins (ish). The official DJI stats say you should get 31-minutes of flight time, but that’s affected by whether you’re recording video, wind speed, flight speed etc.

 

Ease of use 

Though the flight controls are the same as the Mavic 2 Pro, the Zoom will take a little extra finesse if you’re planning on using the zoom feature to get some dynamic shots.

Conclusion

The Mavic series is a very versatile group of aircraft. With the size, range and quality to deliver on a number of different client projects, a Mavic is quickly becoming an essential piece of kit for every filmmaker.

If you’re looking for something that takes up barely any space, kicks out 4k video and allows you to get a new perspective on your shot then the Mavic is probably the best place to start.

We will be doing some more comparisons in coming months, so let us know what you’d be interested in hearing about by commenting on this post or sending us a message on social media!

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